Aeropress vs V60: find out how to make the best coffee

We've put the V60 and the Aeropress head-to-head to help find which brew method is best for you.

There are so many methods of making a cup of coffee that it can be overwhelming trying to work out which one is best for you. That’s why we’ve pitted two of the most popular against each other in a home-brew showdown.

First, thing - what's the difference between an Aeropress and V60?

The V60 is a classic pour over method of brewing coffee. The V60’s name describes the shape of the device - an inverted cone where the V-shaped walls meet at 60 degrees. Japanese glassware producer Hario only introduced the V60 to the market as recently as 2004 as a new pour over design to challenge more traditional immersion methods. The V60 has rapidly become one of the most popular brewing devices in the coffee industry for competitors and home-brew beginners alike.

The Aerobie Aeropress is a brewing method that combines immersion with pressure. The Aeropress was invented by Allan Adler in 2005. Fed up with the devices on the market which only allowed him to brew large batches of coffee, Adler’s new Aeropress was designed to make just one strong espresso-like cup. The innovative device uses air pressure, created by a plunger, to enhance the flavour and reduce the time spent on the process. It’s one of the most popular methods on the market an even has its own dedicated annual brewing competition.

How do you use them?

The V60 is very straight-forward to use - pop a filter paper in the funnel, add ground coffee and just-boiled water - enjoy your coffee in just a few minutes. You can watch our recommended brew guide here.
TIP: The V60 can be sensitive to changes in your coffee grind size and pouring style. A burr-grinder with stepless grind adjustment and a swan-neck pour-over kettle are recommended to keep your brewing techniques as consistent as possible. You can read our guide to fixing your V60 problems here.

The Aeropress has a few more components to it, but don't be intimidated. Insert a filter, the coffee and water, wait a few moments then push the plunger hard to force all the flavour out the coffee and into your cup (while simultaneously cleaning the device). So efficient! You can watch our recommended brew guide here.
TIP: you'll end up with a short and strong coffee which you can dilute to taste and even split between a couple of cups to share.

Taste test: Aeropress vs V60

The V60 produces a delicate, light-bodied, almost tea-like cup, bringing out the nuances of your coffee. Try brewing a single-origin with your V60 - this method with bring out subtle flavours you may have never found before. 

The Aeropress on the other hand makes a full bodied cup of coffee with a real oomph. Natural coffee really shine when brewed through an Aeropress. 

Which should I use? Aeropress or V60?

Choose the V60 if you want to explore the nuanced flavours of coffee. It can be very sensitive to variation in the grind size or pouring style, so it’s perfect if you enjoy the joys (or sometimes frustration) of tweaking parameters to achieve the perfect end result. And when you get it just right, you'll have made a truly exceptional cup of coffee.
BUT if you like your coffee milky you might want to steer towards a different method -  too much milk may overwhelm the delicate flavours you’ve just extracted. 

Choose the Aeropress if you want a more forgiving brew method. It's swift, it's portable, it's pretty mess free (and difficult to break) - an ideal introduction to a hands-on style of brewing at home. If you want to taste clarity in the cup, but with a bit more oomph than a pour over, this is for you!
BUT if you're trying to make enough coffee to quench a crowd look elsewhere - this is only suitable for small batch brewing.


SHOP: We have everything in our brew shop to make your coffee taste spot on, whatever your method
Tagged with: Brew Better

Older Post

Shop now

Discover our products

Coffee Beans & Ground

Shop Now

Coffee Pods

Shop Now

Accessories

Shop Now

Collection title

Shop Now